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d40todie4
19-01-2011, 12:02 PM
hey guys, just fitted my digital boost gauge to my
d40 td.

for people who'm dont know, i was hitting 22psi
max.

now im assuming that its really high, but is it standard?
or is my navara about to blow up?

i will be fitting a egr block off on it and
the pyrometre as soon as nissan
fix's my car tomorrow.

any questions on fitment let me know happy to help out!!! :)

4.8GU
20-01-2011, 11:06 AM
where are you picking up boost pressure from, before or after the intercooler.

Generally it is accepted that they run up to about 19/20psi std but I would imagine with some variation in gauge accuracy/ambient temps and load you might see 22.

If ya put a pyro on it be prepared to be shocked for a while until you get used to how high they run just cruising at 100km/h.

d40todie4
20-01-2011, 01:57 PM
where are you picking up boost pressure from, before or after the intercooler.

Generally it is accepted that they run up to about 19/20psi std but I would imagine with some variation in gauge accuracy/ambient temps and load you might see 22.

If ya put a pyro on it be prepared to be shocked for a while until you get used to how high they run just cruising at 100km/h.

i fitted the boost gauge just after the intercooler on the intake manifold side
the average it is hitting is 19-20 like you say, fitting the egr vlave will reduce the tempretures dematically i have been told by a guy with a 3.0ltr gu patrol, is this correct?

4.8GU
21-01-2011, 10:49 AM
nope I don't think this is correct.

Leprechaun
21-01-2011, 11:00 AM
Blocking the EGR will raise EGT's, that's why they recommend doing a exhaust upgrade first.

ONLOCK
21-01-2011, 11:49 AM
i thought it lowered your egts as it stops hot exaust gases flowing through your motor keeping your intake temps down. isnt this why they recommend it on zd30's to stop melting pistons? correct me if im wrong, seems logical to me

Raziel
21-01-2011, 12:00 PM
Its mentioned else where in the forum that the egr mod is recommended only on the 3.0 d22's and not the d40's.

Something to do with the turbo if I remember right.

Chris

Old.Tony
21-01-2011, 06:20 PM
The EGR mod can be done on any vehicle.

EGR is exhaust gas being returned to the intake manifold to lower the temperature of combustion so that less oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are produced. The EGR valve is closed (ie no EGR is used in the combustion) while the engine is idling or the throttle is open fully. In the EGR pipe, just as it passes around the front of the motor, you'll see a thicker section with two rubber hoses coming from it - this section cools the EGR so that it can be much more effective. EGR is designed to dampen combustion temps, because at high temps the chemical process of burning diesel fuel causes the creation of nitrogen oxides.

The EGTs are hottest when the throttle is fully open - and since there's no EGR at this point, you can be fairly certain that removing the EGR won't have any effect. It's really only for "cruising speeds" that EGR is used.

In my opinion, the entire reason for the EGR installation is bullshit, because to save the couple of percent of NOx, you're burning an extra several % of fuel to develop the power needed to push the vehicle. Block the EGR, reduce the fossil fuel combustion and save the NOx output as well.

Our D40 has had its EGR blocked for some time - my fuel spreadsheet says it was done during the tank that ended at 24980km, and we've just done over 47300km now and there's no issue with the turbo.

Fuel consumption dropped slightly, spool-up of the turbo improved slightly (the power came on stronger) and the car felt like it had a little more "momentum" under very light throttle. It seems to have a bit more kick when lightly depressing the accelerator to move off from a standing start, so car park maneuvering has changed a little.

I will be fitting a pyrometer to mine, and will mount this on the exhaust manifold BEFORE the turbocharger, because the turbo will cause the temps to drop significantly. Jaycar sell a kit for a high-range temperature gauge (http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView.asp?ID=KC5376&CATID=25&form=CAT&SUBCATID=347) and it is my intention to combine this with two other kits to produce an EGT-monitoring turbo timer that hopefully will be a "plug and play" for the Nissan Navara D40.

I hadn't thought of a boost gauge myself - it's not something that I had considered dangerous to the vehicle's operation, as long as the turbo was operating normally, but I suppose if the actuator had an issue, there might be some dangerous boost levels - I might mull this idea over.

Bosshog
29-01-2011, 03:06 AM
I got a pyro gauge fitted, running a 'hot' chip mod and EGR blocked. Exhaust temps are amazingly high on D40s! Around town over 400C at idle 250ish (and 350C idling when ECU decides to do a burn) and easily over 750C under full load.

Raziel
29-01-2011, 09:38 AM
Hey Tony,

What sort of Spreadsheet are you using for your car? What sort of info/stats do you record in it? - "my fuel spreadsheet says it was done during the tank that ended at 24980km, and we've just done over 47300km now and there's no issue with the turbo.
"

Sound's like somthing I should be doing :)

Chris

Old.Tony
29-01-2011, 09:59 AM
It's an excel spreadsheet that lists the following items across the columns:

Date - the date that I bought the fuel
Odo - the amount my odometer showed at the time
KM - the figure on my tripmeter, which I reset at every fuel fill
TotalKM - adding the previous ODO figure plus trip meter. It's a check, to make sure I didn't miss one.
Litres - the litres that I just put in the tank
LPHK - a calculation, litres/(km/100)
Expected Range - a calculation, 80*100/LPHK
Pump Price - the cost of the fuel on the bowser
Cost - the amount I paid for the fuel
Cost Errors - if the cost is not very close to pump price times litres, show what it should have been otherwise show "OK"
Driving Type - towing, city, highway, mountains etc
Where Bought - sorta obvious :)
Notes - how much 2-stroke I used, or Chemtech, or if it had bio and what % etc.

Nothing complex in it, just gotta keep doing it. I have summary info at the top of the sheet showing the total km travelled, total fuel bought (6,912.13 litres), total amount paid ($8,678.69), Overall Average LPHK (14.92), Best Tank (639.9km), Best LPHK (10.46), Worst LPHK (24.82), Best expected range (765km).

Piece of cake.

d40todie4
29-01-2011, 02:18 PM
It's an excel spreadsheet that lists the following items across the columns:

Date - the date that I bought the fuel
Odo - the amount my odometer showed at the time
KM - the figure on my tripmeter, which I reset at every fuel fill
TotalKM - adding the previous ODO figure plus trip meter. It's a check, to make sure I didn't miss one.
Litres - the litres that I just put in the tank
LPHK - a calculation, litres/(km/100)
Expected Range - a calculation, 80*100/LPHK
Pump Price - the cost of the fuel on the bowser
Cost - the amount I paid for the fuel
Cost Errors - if the cost is not very close to pump price times litres, show what it should have been otherwise show "OK"
Driving Type - towing, city, highway, mountains etc
Where Bought - sorta obvious :)
Notes - how much 2-stroke I used, or Chemtech, or if it had bio and what % etc.

Nothing complex in it, just gotta keep doing it. I have summary info at the top of the sheet showing the total km travelled, total fuel bought (6,912.13 litres), total amount paid ($8,678.69), Overall Average LPHK (14.92), Best Tank (639.9km), Best LPHK (10.46), Worst LPHK (24.82), Best expected range (765km).

Piece of cake.

under your notes, you mention 2stroke and chemtech, what do you mean by these two things, sorry but im new to the deisel engines.
i know how they work but im unsure on how they can perform better on fuels or chemicals?

Old.Tony
29-01-2011, 09:43 PM
under your notes, you mention 2stroke and chemtech, what do you mean by these two things, sorry but im new to the deisel engines.
i know how they work but im unsure on how they can perform better on fuels or chemicals?

You'll find some threads in these forums about additives for diesel fuel. One of those is 2-stroke oil. Chemtech make a specific diesel fuel additive as well.

I've tried both. I find the Chemtech stuff is pretty much useless, so I'm not bothering with that again. 2-stroke is a different story, as long as you get the right brand.

I tried 2 different brands of 2-stroke oil (adding 300ml to a full tank) and inmy experience (which may differ from everyone else's), Valvoline oil didn't make any difference at all, but Castol Activ 2T quietened the injectors and improved the vehicle's performance marginally (about 1 litre per hundred km better economy).

Again, this is my personal experience. I note the things that I do to the fuel in my spreadsheet so that as a historical reference, I can look back at it and see when certain things were done that may have had an impact on performance and/or economy, which is what this spreadsheet is all about.

Pete22
29-01-2011, 11:11 PM
You'll find some threads in these forums about additives for diesel fuel. One of those is 2-stroke oil. Chemtech make a specific diesel fuel additive as well.

I've tried both. I find the Chemtech stuff is pretty much useless, so I'm not bothering with that again. 2-stroke is a different story, as long as you get the right brand.

I tried 2 different brands of 2-stroke oil (adding 300ml to a full tank) and inmy experience (which may differ from everyone else's), Valvoline oil didn't make any difference at all, but Castol Activ 2T quietened the injectors and improved the vehicle's performance marginally (about 1 litre per hundred km better economy).

Again, this is my personal experience. I note the things that I do to the fuel in my spreadsheet so that as a historical reference, I can look back at it and see when certain things were done that may have had an impact on performance and/or economy, which is what this spreadsheet is all about.

Tony you mention 300ml to the take - is that for the standard 80ltr tank? I've fitted a 160ltr aftermarket tank so would you recommend 600ml in my case?

Old.Tony
30-01-2011, 02:26 AM
As a general guide Pete, yes 600ml. People have used up to 1 litre in 80, I'm not sure I'd go that far, but since the oil is designed to be combusted, is low ash, and chemically combines with the diesel (rather than emulsifying) it shouldn't ever be a problem using 600ml in your 160L tank.

For those that are interested: liquids combine in two different ways (generally, excluding highly reactive combinations like hydraulic fluid and chlorine). One is emulsification, where the two components spread themselves throughout each other but can separate after a time (like oil will settle to the top of water).

The other is a chemical combination, where the actual chemical structure of the liquid is changed through the addition of the other product. No matter how long you leave the liquid to sit, they won't separate and form layers in the container (like water and diesel will). This means that if you DO choose to put 2-stroke in the diesel, you don't have to worry about leaving your car sit there for a few days.

xdo
10-03-2011, 12:36 AM
I will be fitting a pyrometer to mine, and will mount this on the exhaust manifold BEFORE the turbocharger, because the turbo will cause the temps to drop significantly. Jaycar sell a kit for a high-range temperature gauge (http://www.jaycar.com.au/productView.asp?ID=KC5376&CATID=25&form=CAT&SUBCATID=347) and it is my intention to combine this with two other kits to produce an EGT-monitoring turbo timer that hopefully will be a "plug and play" for the Nissan Navara D40.[/QUOTE]

@Tony!
Did you fit this kit on ur yet? like to see how you go with that, bought 2 days ago, opened last night, read instruction, the probe measure max 250*C, if use for EGT have to buy other probe, did order 2 high T upto 1000*C and wait for part.
If you did, could you give me your address, like to see how to connect it, i'm at Wallsend.
Regards
Joe.