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  #31  
Old 21-04-2017, 01:38 PM
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About $370 ish if I recall. I already had the batteries and charger. Of all the cordless tools the one advantage of the Makita gear is the ability to use 2 18v batts so you don't need to invest in a new charger and batteries. Other brands may follow this lead. They now make a 350mm brushless saw that also uses 2 18v batts that looks like an absolute cracker

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  #32  
Old 21-04-2017, 10:56 PM
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Very helpful info gents, if Tony had not looked into the inverter more we'd be none the wiser to it's false claims. Mine is fine but I use it for short bursts, I think running a heating element in a 3 way for hours may be a load most cheap inverters cannot maintain. I'll look at this Projecta and give it a go, for $139 I'd rather start with a new one and they seem to get a good review.
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  #33  
Old 21-04-2017, 11:37 PM
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I've considered buying one of these - I already have the lawn mower, hedger and whipper snipper, so the battery and charger are already here. Lawn mower is the older brushed-motor type but when the ground is soft and my Honda HRX217 wants to play submarine, the Ryobi just goes to work. Generally get to do my whole front yard (22m x 13m minus a concrete path and a driveway) on a single charge.

As for the Ryobi chainsaw, they've now added a chain brake (didn't have one originally) and the brushless motor is a big step up. You'll notice that the One+ 18V chainsaw does NOT have a chain brake so it's something I'd steer clear of. The chain in the 18V version is also less capable, with only half the cutting teeth of the 36V version and a shorter (250mm - 10in) bar compared to the 36V (350mm - 14in).

An inverter would easily provide power for the chargers. Even if they had a 1 hour charger, the 36V 5Ah battery is just 180W, allow 50% for overheads = 270W and still not much to worry about.

Where you'd get into trouble with an inverter in a portable solution is trying to power one of these. Yes it's got a 400mm bar and it's technically around 3hp, but providing 2300W of 240V AC via an inverter has other issues - like current draw from the battery being up near 200A - you could start a 4cyl car with that power draw, don't use a deep cycle for it! Even your common generators (Honda Eu20) can't supply the power needed.

So for small operations (recovery, opportunistic grabs at firewood etc) a cordless job is ideal. 18V probably not, despite its cheaper price (and the fact that I have half a dozen 18V batteries and 3 chargers) because you'd want to cut wood, not rub it to death. Stihl make a good unit but its power isn't far in excess of the Ryobi 36V brushless unit so if you already had some Ryobi gear, going Stihl wouldn't make sense, but if you were just starting out - Stihl make a good range of cordless gear.

You can't really charge the thing via an inverter in the cabin. It's not that the batteries give off gas, but your cig lighter is rated to 10A, and 270W (the guesstimate from above) is about 22.5A so you'd do a fuse in rather quickly. The highest charge rate (allowing an amp for losses) is about 80W in the cabin. If your charger does that, then you should be fine, otherwise it's in the tub with some heavy cabling!
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  #34  
Old 27-04-2017, 08:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old.Tony View Post

My fridge draws about 380W under 240V. Aldi sell a 600W inverter for just $59 and I thought superb, let's do it - so I did. It worked fine.
Cheaper isn't always the best.
Brilliant insight OldTony. Something that not many people would have thought to check on.
Well done mate and thanks for sharing
Cheers Steve
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  #35  
Old 28-04-2017, 12:52 AM
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On the 12 volt vs 240 volt heating elements thing:

With a simple resistive load only heat and light are produced.

so if a 12v 150w element is actually using the rated 150w of energy, the only way for it to not heat as efficiently as a 240v element is if the element is producing significant light also

The difference you notice oldtony, is more than likely due to a lot of 12v stuff being nowhere near the rated wattage

Im a sparky so im lucky enough to have a kyoritsu DC clamp current meter so i can quickly and easily test everything for their current draw, fridges, solar panels, inverter etc

Unfortunately they're about $500 or id recommend everyone on here get one for testing their 12v setups
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  #36  
Old 28-04-2017, 12:54 AM
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http://www.kew-ltd.co.jp/en/products/detail/00035/
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  #37  
Old 28-04-2017, 12:57 AM
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If anyones going to buy one of these online be very careful, there are a lot of fake chinese made Kyoritsu meters for sale online

If you're not experienced it can be hard to tell until you take it to a meter calibrator
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  #38  
Old 28-04-2017, 03:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old.Tony View Post
As for the Ryobi chainsaw, they've now added a chain brake (didn't have one originally) and the brushless motor is a big step up. You'll notice that the One+ 18V chainsaw does NOT have a chain brake so it's something I'd steer clear of. The chain in the 18V version is also less capable, with only half the cutting teeth of the 36V version and a shorter (250mm - 10in) bar compared to the 36V (350mm - 14in).
I have the older (blue) 18v one+ chainsaw. I didn't buy it, but found in council clean up and was surprised when I popped in a battery and it worked. It doesn't need a chain brake as the chain runs really slowly and pretty much stops immediately the trigger is released anyway. Not sure if the newer versions run the same speed though.

I wouldn't recommend one to buy, but it's been handy cutting smaller bits for firewood and pruning duties at home.

One that has anyone powered a standard Ryobi 18v charger off an inverter successfully? As I've now got a range of one+ stuff it would be handy to take a charger along in the cravan to charge batteries for lights, fan, chainsaw or whatever else seems like a good idea.

Last edited by GunMentalGrey; 28-04-2017 at 03:49 AM.
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  #39  
Old 28-04-2017, 04:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunMentalGrey View Post
I have the older (blue) 18v one+ chainsaw. I didn't buy it, but found in council clean up and was surprised when I popped in a battery and it worked. It doesn't need a chain brake as the chain runs really slowly and pretty much stops immediately the trigger is released anyway. Not sure if the newer versions run the same speed though.

I wouldn't recommend one to buy, but it's been handy cutting smaller bits for firewood and pruning duties at home.

One that has anyone powered a standard Ryobi 18v charger off an inverter successfully? As I've now got a range of one+ stuff it would be handy to take a charger along in the cravan to charge batteries for lights, fan, chainsaw or whatever else seems like a good idea.
You would be ok running a charger off an inverter. Just have a look at the bottom of the charger and see if it has either an amp or watt draw and make sure your inverter is appropriately sized. Alternatively, ryobi do a 12v car charger, whether they are any good or not I couldn't say.

On the chainsaw topic, they now do a standard one or a brushless one in the 18v one+ range. The standard one apparently has a push button chain oiling setup, whereas the brushless one is automatic. They aren't cheap though, even for the "skin only" without batteries...

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  #40  
Old 28-04-2017, 09:09 AM
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+1 for Bods' advice. I've used my One+ 18V charger in the car before, had no drama at all. It's not actually high wattage - one of my chargers (I have 3, thanks to the number of 18V kits I've bought) states on the bottom that it's a 55W device - you could use a ciggy lighter outlet (10A) and one of those can inverters to provide the juice for it without any worry at all.

I really can't see an 18V - even brushless - chainsaw having a huge amount of power. If you're talking actual power (Czechmate will know this very well) an 18V unit drawing 2 amps is using just 36W of power - that's around 1/20th of a horsepower. My Stihl MS180 (which I checked while I was getting firewood ready for winter, has an 050 chain now instead of the 043) is rated at 1.5Kw or 2Hp, and even at 36V and 4A we're only talking a quarter of a horse power (36 * 4 = 144Watts) at the most. I think common sense is going to rule and if I do get a cordless saw, it's going to be for emergencies only, the Stihl will stay in the ute.

I have a habit now of sharpening the chain - 3-4 swipes with a hand tool (exactly this one) that does both the tooth and the rake at the same time. I do this after every tank of fuel. Needless to say, you really don't want to put your hands anywhere near my chain even when it's off - it bites hard!
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