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  #11  
Old 10-02-2018, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by ericcs View Post
i was under the impression all d40's had variable vane turbo's, pre 09's are vacuum, post are electronic. D22's are fixed vane.i had vacuum leaks, resulting in the actuator not closing the vanes, so they were open all the time. this slowed the boosting and made the car much louder
I have a feeling the single cab dx had a wastegate turbo. Can't remember the power output, 104kw maybe?
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  #12  
Old 11-02-2018, 12:02 AM
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he mention's his is an stx, so it's a 126kw, should be variable vane!
you'd probably be right with the DX!
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Old 11-02-2018, 01:46 AM
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Yep for sure. All the others definitely have a variable vane turbo. Earlier ones were vacuum controlled and later ones electronic control.
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  #14  
Old 11-02-2018, 06:12 AM
Bosley99 Bosley99 is offline
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Thank you all for your responses.

ericcs ... you're correct. I have a Garrett M24 EC2 turbo ... see link, it's a VNT
https://garrett.honeywell.com/produc...083&p=UNLINKED

Old.Tony ... my old Autel scan gauge doesn't have anything I can use to monitor turbo boost. I'll check out more modern gauges.
Can't notice any performance improvement, no smoke and no codes. If I didn't have the gauge I wouldn't know there was a potential problem.

Initially I thought because the gauge is mechanical there would be a low probability of a problem. Having thought about it, pressure coming into the gauge must come up against some form of resistance that moves the dial. If that resistance is lower than it should be then I would get an incorrect reading. Not sure how they work but have emailed Auto Meter in the US. I'll see if I can confirm the gauge is showing the correct pressure during the week.

Thank you again for sharing your knowledge and experience ... it's good to know you're out there and willing to help.

Last edited by Bosley99; 11-02-2018 at 06:22 AM.
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Old 15-02-2018, 04:33 AM
Bosley99 Bosley99 is offline
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Problem solved. Hose to Boost Sensor was disconnected. Obviously not properly pushed on when the boost sensor was replaced, so when driving for about 40 mins then proceeding up a few kms of steep highway, changing down a gear and giving it a bit of throttle, it finally came off.

Also, I found the MAP reading on my scan gauge that showed 100kPa (complete vacuum) even when I drove it around. After reconnection, it sits around the 14kPa level at idle.

So as far as I understand it, the ECU doesn't get a reading and continues to tell the solenoid to apply vacuum via the actuator, thereby keeping the vanes closed and ramping up boost as engine revs and therefore exhaust gasses increase.

What I don't understand it why I wan't getting more power as the PSI climbed to 35psi+. EGTs remained low, so I guessing there wasn't more fuel being added.

Anyway, for me, an education in VNT turbochargers and an opportunity to interact with people who are prepared to help.
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Old 15-02-2018, 07:04 AM
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Good stuff, glad it was an easy fix. Interesting too that it was boosting, I didn't think they worked without vacuum, but obviously they do.

As for the power, you are correct. The ecu would have a set fuel map for throttle position and load. Even if the boost is higher than what it should be, it won't increase fuel. Boost without fuel just lowers egts. I'm surprised the ecu didn't go into limp mode with an overboost, I guess since the ecu wasn't seeing boost it didn't realise...

I guess it also shows the advantage of having a mechanical boost gauge. As you said, it drove normally. 35psi long term wouldn't do the intake system or engine a lot of good and without a boost gauge you would never have known.

Last edited by bods; 15-02-2018 at 07:15 AM.
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