Go Back   The Navara Forum > D40 > D40 550 Engine & Gearbox

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

  #11  
Old 01-01-2017, 02:11 PM
landmannnn landmannnn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: UK
Posts: 10
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by landmannnn View Post
Yes, the manual references an electric fan or a viscous crankshaft driven fan. In fact the V9X has a crankshaft driven fan controlled by an electromagnet.
This fan is engine temperature linked, from the graphs supplied it looks like the coolant fan pays no attention to the air con!
Actually I am wrong, looking at page 1247 on the EC manual, the cooling fan control is far more complicated and does look at the air con.

Looking at the description, the electromagnet isn't on/off but is actually used for controlling the fan speed by pulsing. So spinning by hand isn't going to tell you very much.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links

  #12  
Old 01-01-2017, 09:42 PM
Old.Tony's Avatar
Old.Tony Old.Tony is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mid Coast Region, NSW, Australia
Posts: 14,477
My Mood:
Garage
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by landmannnn View Post
Actually I am wrong, looking at page 1247 on the EC manual, the cooling fan control is far more complicated and does look at the air con.

Looking at the description, the electromagnet isn't on/off but is actually used for controlling the fan speed by pulsing. So spinning by hand isn't going to tell you very much.
The wiring diagrams (that I was looking in for a connection) isn't any better at providing an answer. However, there's a way to tell if the fan is engaging. It works regardless of the method of engaging the fan (electric or bimetal).

Drive the car with the stereo off and the windows down, A/C on low, UP a hill that you can drive straight over (you need to NOT turn the car around on the hill, you NEED to keep moving). Drive it hard enough to raise the coolant temperature to over 100C (probably try and get it between 105C and 110C, but NO higher to avoid damage. At this point the coolant fan should be fully engaged.

Crest the hill and take your foot off the throttle. You should be able to hear a loud rushing sound due to the air being hauled through the radiator/intercooler/condensor. As the coolant temp drops (which it will do, rapidly) your engine will go very quiet. If that transition occurs, your fan hub is working normally.

As I said, this one of the tests I use for my viscous hub but it should work for an electrically engaged hub too.

The manual is unclear about when the fan is fully engaged but it should consider 110C to be near the upper limit of tolerance for the engine operation, because of the materials used in the motor. In the YD25 it specifically states 105C as the point when the electric fan will come on to assist (if the air conditioning is turned off).
__________________

Check out the FAQs by clicking here!

Visit the Australian National Navara Muster website: www.navaramuster.com.au

"Unfortunately we live in a society where pizza gets to your house faster than the police can."
Reply With Quote

  #13  
Old 01-01-2017, 11:42 PM
nissan_510 nissan_510 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 15
Default

Tony, I've heard it roaring before, even yesterday when i started the car it was already engaged and roared for about 10 seconds then switched off, the problem is i revved the engine up to 103deg in park with aircon on and got nothing. just had the old mans 550 over here, could not get the fan to engage via the aircon, tried it in low range reverse also to see if that may have triggered it and got nothing, but it did flick on just by coolant temp at about 89deg. which mine won't .
so landman are you saying its viscous that drives it and fan speed is electronically controlled?
so if mines not coming on with temp then my viscous hub must be stuffed? nothing electrical to do with it? or can the magnet engage the fan regardless of the viscous component?
thanks for your help again guys.
Reply With Quote

  #14  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:03 AM
jonney jonney is offline
Advanced Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Sunshine Coast
Posts: 1,138
Default

you can buy an after market viscious fan hub off ebay . don,t buy a genuine one unless your pocket is full of dollars.
Reply With Quote

  #15  
Old 02-01-2017, 10:45 AM
Old.Tony's Avatar
Old.Tony Old.Tony is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mid Coast Region, NSW, Australia
Posts: 14,477
My Mood:
Garage
Default

It might not be a completely viscous hub. It seems the hub's electromagnet does the engaging by pulsing power to it - the more frequent the pulses, the firmer the engagement. You'd have to make sure any aftermarket hub was made the same, and you'd want to be sure that your electronics aren't actually the thing at fault.

What's the chance of borrowing your father's fan unit?
__________________

Check out the FAQs by clicking here!

Visit the Australian National Navara Muster website: www.navaramuster.com.au

"Unfortunately we live in a society where pizza gets to your house faster than the police can."
Reply With Quote

  #16  
Old 02-01-2017, 12:31 PM
nissan_510 nissan_510 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 15
Default

yeah exactly what I'm trying to find out, no point buying a new hub if its not at fault.
but if i don't know how to trigger the damn thing, really need a scan gauge that can trigger it that way, prob gonna mean a trip to nissan which i was hoping to avoid :( there should be a way i can do it myself, i believe the electronic control is sent via CAN which I'm not all that familiar with.
Reply With Quote

  #17  
Old 03-01-2017, 10:12 PM
landmannnn landmannnn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: UK
Posts: 10
Default

A couple of things to think about....

The BCM will control the electromagnet by PWM (pulse width modulation), you will be able to monitor this with an oscilloscope, however you should be able use a multimeter on the alternating current setting to see if a voltage is being applied.

As far as the triggers, they are
Engine speed,
Coolant temp,
Refrigerant pressure,
Road speed,
Coolant fan speed,
AC on
AC blower on,
Intake temperature
So running it up to temperature in neutral probably won't trigger it.

This level of complexity means that without knowledge of the source code and a lab, the only diagnosis tool is to swap the bits until it works. That's what Nissan would do.
Reply With Quote

  #18  
Old 04-01-2017, 10:17 AM
Old.Tony's Avatar
Old.Tony Old.Tony is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mid Coast Region, NSW, Australia
Posts: 14,477
My Mood:
Garage
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by landmannnn View Post
This level of complexity means that without knowledge of the source code and a lab, the only diagnosis tool is to swap the bits until it works. That's what Nissan would do.
And that's NOT because the average Nissan tech thinks that a lab is something that helps a blind person.

It would be interesting to see the guts of one. What makes it fail? Does it work like the electric brakes in a trailer?
__________________

Check out the FAQs by clicking here!

Visit the Australian National Navara Muster website: www.navaramuster.com.au

"Unfortunately we live in a society where pizza gets to your house faster than the police can."
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:36 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
| Home | Register | FAQ | Members List | Calendar | Today's Posts | Search | New Posts |